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. foreigners sneak into america and take american jobs, there ought to be a law, government ought to do something. that's just the way pple think, it's instinct. i have to admit how i used to think, took me decades to realize i was wrong, passing a law often does more harm than good. and progress comes from millions of individuals acting to make themselves better off guided by an invisible hand that inadvertently helps others. not to viewers of the "stossel" show, but to normal people. when there is a problem, government should address it. my next guest says they know what our brain is wired that way. an evolutionary psychiatrist at the university of california santa barbara and the author of the mind of the market. so, there is your book, let me start with you since you talk about the mind. you say the faith in government comes from evolution and? >> the natural propensity we have is if people have more stuff than somebody else, there must have been something else done wrong, something immoral, something unfair because in the small band of hunter and gatherer in very resource poor envi
cpi would change the way the federal government calculate inflation. which could possibly save the government $300 billion over the next decade if implemented. normally every year, wages and prices go up. the consumer price index, the cpi measures how much they go up by tracking a basket of goods that americans typically buy. it's important, it's used to calculate cost of living adjustments on social security. checks pay a little more each year in line with inflation, as calculated by the cpi. now one potential flaw in the system, cpi assumes people don't change their basket of the price of meat goes up. they don't switch from meat to chicken because the price of beef has gone up. they don't switch from say, arugula to iceberg lettuce, it doesn't account for how behavior changes. chained cpi presents a chained basket of goods, measuring how people react to price changes, not simply the fact that prices have changed. now chained cpi would account for fact that you're buying more chicken when beef is too expensive. that could result in a slower rate of inflation, it saves the gov
of slavery? well, last week the federal government as it does, you know, once or twice a year came out with its latest figures on birthrights. and in particular on one i'm going to point to is the illegitimacy rate or out-of-wedlock births. here they are. 72.3% of african-americans now are born out of wedlock. 72.3%. american indians, 66.2%. latinos, it's 53.3%. for whites it's still pretty high, but it's 29.1 percent. and for asians it's 17.2%. so in other words, seven out of ten, six out of ten, five out of ten for blacks, american end yangs and latinos. these are the so-called underrepresented minorities that get racial preferences. and then fewer than three out of ten and fewer than two out of ten for whites and aiz items -- asians, people who are typically discriminated against. it is no accident that these figures line up quite well with how well different groups are doing not only in terms of education, but in terms of crime and, you know, whatever social indicator you want. that is the real problem. and, of course, that is not going to be fixed by racial preferences and univers
-fire between government and rebel forces.o >> there are many other organizations that do medical care and food provisions. never enough. what is new here is civilians protecting civilians. >> ifill: itn's john sparks reports on police officers in china, and their accusations of widespread corruption by local officials. and jeffrey brown samples the poetry about greece's financial woes and its austerity measures. >> we'll hock the person to buy our bread. if you believe the headlines, then we're sunk. greece downgraded deeper into junk. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour.n >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: much
profiles a group of peacekeepers struggling to maintain a fragile cease-fire between government and rebel forces. itn's john sparks reports on police officers in china, and their accusations of widespread corruption by local officials. and jeffrey brown samples the poetry about greece's financial woes and its austerity measures. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: the election commission in egypt confirmed today the new constitution won nearly 64% of the vote in a referendum. the panel also reported turnout was just a third of the country's 52 million registered voters. president mohammed morsi and his muslim brotherhood backed the draft constitution. opponents warned it paves the way for islamic rule and curbs on civil liberties. the six persian gulf arab nations demanded an end to what they called iranian interference. they issued a statement today at the end of the gulf cooperation council's annual summit. the statement gave no details. the six u.s. allied countries, also called for swift international action to end the bl
. the washington post reports the yemeni government tried to hide u.s. responsibility for the attack by taking credit for carrying it out. the yemeni government also initially claimed only militants were killed in the strike, or forced to withdraw that claim after mourners tried to bring the dead bodies to the gates of the presidential residence. according to the washington post, the attack has devastated the community and militants in surrounding areas have gained more recruits for their fight against the u.s.-backed yemeni government since it occurred. diplomatic cables released by wikileaks in 2010 show the u.s. and yemen have repeatedly covered up the use of u.s. warplanes to bomb yemen. according to the bureau of investigative journalism, covert u.s. operations have killed up to 171 civilians there including 35 children over the past decade. a top syrian general responsible for preventing military defections has defected himself to syria's opposition brigit major-general abdul al-shallal, the head of syria's military police, crossed into neighboring turkey and a daring break with the regi
with the gold standard. now, what could the greek government have done? two greek prime ministers. one from 2004 to 2009. in greece, greece has had experience with that since 1974 after the expiration of parliamentary democracy. government, regardless of which party is in government, the accelerator to create some kind of flimsy growth, at some point it became clear that we had a cliff. our debt situation would get too much. and then we would hit the brakes. austerity. which creates increased unemployment. but nevertheless, the debt was manageable. they did this up until 2004. 2004 was accelerated because of the olympics. the next government should have stopped it. but unfortunately government is government. government kept the foot firmly on the accelerator. why? because german capital was flowing to the country at cheap rates, financing ponzi schemes. it is just like the subprime market here where people were coerced to take loans that could not afford. similarly in greece. so, you had executives coming to greece, bribing politicians. the greek government -- they did not listen. then 2008. the
back to the mid-1950s has ever cut government spending. we continued to add spending every year, both parties guilty. why should that change? why should anyone watching us right now believe anybody in washington's going to be fiscally responsible? >> adam, it's the right question, and that's dwr i said a minute ago, we need a big deal. if it's a smaller deal, remember, we got to go to the debt ceiling discussion and some of the other trigger points and make sure we get the savings and the entitlement reform and the things we need to get this deficit and debt under control. it's about getting the economy on track and also getting the deficit under control. adam: you are a moderate, highly popular in the state of north dakota, and you have compromised with both sides on these issues, but the vast majority of the public looks at congress, all of you, the house of representatives and the senate looking at you guys with disgust. is that coming across in the halls of the capitol? do the people there understand what the people out here, the 310 million of us consider when we think about the
a social security, medicare, medicaid. that is not the only entitlements. every government program that has a retirement benefit, a health-care benefit, those are entitlements, two, up to and including the entitlements for the congressman. let's be fair. when they start talking about entitlements and hold it to those three items, let's hold their feet to the fire and make them talk about entitlements for the other folks, too. host: appreciate you calling this morning. donna writes about this on twitter. if that to facebook here. -- back to you facebook here. budget showdown hits the keep week. that is of the front page reminding us of the deadline looming. it is a bloomberg story here out of the district. i you can watch the byplay here on the c-span that works with the president heading back to town tonight. the senate and house are due back tomorrow. billy from jacksonville, florida, to life for waiting. caller: i am very optimistic but i worry that the president will not get a chance because lindsey gramm already stated he will fight. i think there will already be another big fight for t
originally called in response to set oralism in government, which i prefer -- secularism in government, which are for. a country which invites everyone into it, all religions and nationalities, must by definition be secular. any religious direction we choose is going to favor somebody, and i thought that is what we were trying to avoid. at least i thought that is what jefferson meant when he talked about religious freedoms. host: ok. caller: freedom from religion. host: when you go to vote in a presidential election or congressional election, what are the big factors in your decision? caller: usually economic. i did not consider -- i don't consider religion unless it interferes with some legislation. it plays a very little role in my life. host: would you call yourself unaffiliated religiously? caller: relatively i am an atheist. so, yes, i am unaffiliated. host: here is the "christian science monitor," their cover. the new face of faith. what is happening in new england, the countries most secular region, may have a future of american religion. traditional religions are seeing their ranks th
of paying for college has shifted from the federal and state governments to the families. the only type of financial aid that has elasticity is the loans. stafford loans have limits. parent + loans have no aggregate limit. it has nothing to do with the family's ability to repay the debt. the second aspect is the students and parents are chasing the dream, and they will sign whatever piece of paper is put in front of them without paying attention to the details. they figure they will figure out how to deal with it after they graduate. there are ways to reduce your debt such as attending and in state public college or a college with generous financial aid policies. that is one of the most effective ways to do that. once you're on campus, you can buy cheaper textbooks and sell them back to the bookstore. but that does not do as much as just going to a less expensive college. >> is the chasing the dream aspect something that in previous generations was possible and able to figure out after work, or is it in knowledge gap in terms of things have changed? why is it more of a problem now, or i
a denunciation of big government liberalism or big government programs. you can see his anti-communism is evolving, his cultural view is evolving. he has not yet gained or acquired the tax-cut philosophy which fit so nicely into his optimistic outlook of empowering individuals to determine their own lives. >> saturday night at 8:00 eastern, craig shirley on the political campaigns of ronald reagan, part of four days of american history tv, right through new year's day, on c- span3. >> you think of washington before the civil war. you think slavery was well entrenched. black people were miserable. that is not true at all. in washington, washington had about 30,000 people as a city. 12,000 of them were black. the majority free, no slaves. >> what led to the first race riots? jefferson morley recounts what happened, part of what today's through new year's day on c- span2's book tv. >> "washington journal" continues. host: damian paletta join us here at the table. thank you for joining us. this is the fourth time that congress has had a post- christmas lame duck session. what doe
the government can just let people build and build and build without some sort. of sort host: thank you. guest: you make a good point, but urban development in florida occupies 10% of the state. most of the -- most of the everglades is protected by state parks. if people want to protect more land, they could buy land and put it under conservation easily, but there is plenty of land available sphere without impacting the everglades in the awkward first. to say that we should confine people to 10% of the state, when you have one of the 3 or four most heavily populated states, means you are seeing newcomers are not welcome, existing renters can not buy houses, our children cannot buy houses. that is not the american dream, to stand in the way of our future. host: the book is entitled "american nightmare -- how government undermines the dream of homeownership. this is from drake cinders -- what land use restrictions would you approve of? guest: a buy support local homeowners imposing their own -- i would support local homeowners' imposing their own restrictions. this is how it works in houston, w
of government, nothing was more important than the maintenance of the system. i will close here by segway to something that might give you a little more than an idea of what is specifically in this book. five differences between the original tea party and today. were five reasons they should have seen their losses coming. [laughter] you have to amuse yourself. [laughter] the original tea party was conducted on british ships as a raid by the sons of liberty, composed largely of working men, sailors, traitors, and storekeepers. today, the so-called tea party and sons of liberty represent the most conservative of the republican party. number two is the original sons of liberty orchestrated an armed rebellion against the british, so that american government could be formed. contemporary tea party and sons of liberty members enjoy the benefits of that very government. they just don't seem very happy that much of the time. number three, most of the wealth in the american colonies was held by british subjects who oppose the common when two parties of the day. every tea party's will happily tell
of these talks, whether it was about government shutdown in the spring of 2011 or the debt limit debate in the summer of 2011 or the payroll tax-cut debate last year, those negotiations started at a level between the president and speaker but always broke down at that level and that pushed to the senate where harry reid and mitch mcconnell had to figure something out and get enough votes for it so they could give some cover to the house republicans, who were joined by a large majority of house democrats to get something done. the idea that we have come to this state is not necessarily surprising. that it has taken us so long to get there has probably frustrated everyone who wanted to take a holiday break. if mitch mcconnell wants to play ball, and i think there's a role for him to do so. when you speak with aids from his office, they say we will get involved, but we would like to see some good faith offer from the majority leader. aides from his office. right now that process has not happened. as for for action today in the senate, it's not going to be anything where they reached the fi
government ends up taking it is important not to take guns out of the hands of hunters or fishermen. >> peter doosey, thank you very much. >> the fiscal cliff is looming and now the president has gone home for the holidays and left for hawaii without a deal in place. with nine days left now, is it too late? remember the house budget committee marcia blackburn joins us now. congressman thank you for joining us. >> sure. >> before we get underway, i would love to play for you. play for you right now the president's words just before he departed on his hawaii vacation. here he is. >> so as we leave town for a few days to be with our families for the holidays, i hope it gives everybody some perspective. everybody can cool off. everybody can drink some eggnog and have some christmas cookies and sing some christmas carols and enjoy the company of loved ones. >> and then, congressman, just after he said that senator jeff sessions of alabama said this, and i shall quote, president obama today gave another speech about the fiscal cliff, no plan, nothing that can be scored or analyzed, just another spe
a country, we have the articles of confederation, and that government's two weeks, writing the constitution. this is where the second amendment obviously comes in. how did that all development? what's the -- >> guest: well, nowadays it's become fashionable among people who support gun rights strongly to pick out this or that quotation from this or that leader like samuel adams, thomas jefferson, or whoever and apply the second amendment was seen as a way to enable individuals to defend themselves and defend themselves against the government when it was tie tyrannical. that's a mismonsing. it was a political matter, the second amount. it was part of what became the bill of rights, and the reason for it is that when -- after the unhappy experience of the articles of confederation that led the founders to try to figure out a better way to govern the country, they came up with the constitution which we know is full of checks and balances, but as it was submitted to the states for ratification, it became clear that they might not get the nine states needed unless there were promises of still mor
cuts and tax increases will impact how much money states get from the federal government. ruben ramirez reports from washington. >> reporter: we all know the numbers. failing to reach a deal by january 1 will result in $109 billion in automatic cuts to federal spending. and while that's a big number, what matters most to states and municipalities is the small print, detailing just where those cuts will happen. and standard & poors' gabe pettek says those details could still be months away. >> even if the policymakers in washington, d.c., resolve the immediate issue before january 1 or shortly thereafter, we think there are going to be several details related to the administration of tax policy and the way the federal government spends money that will have an important effect on state budgets. >> reporter: the pew center on the states reports around 18% of federal grants to states would be subject to sequestration's spending cuts. that works out to about $7.5 billion the states could ultimately lose. >> the real worry right now for states is that as many states start there legislative se
of those outside the box ideas that the federal government should take seriously here? >> first of all, i don't know -- i would like to know, first of all how many schools there are in america. high schools, middle schools, preschools, private christian academies? the point is this is unfeasible. i'm not sure it's the right way to go to put an armed guard in every single school in america. who will pick up the taxpayer dla are on that? the counties, it is states? the locals the feds? who will do this? it's impractical. to the some mention i don't like guns in our schools. it's a nice political sound bite and they can use an old statement from bill clinton to say this, but i'm not sure it's a practical idea, frankly. >> first of all, when it comes to education, decisions really do need to be handled on a local level. that's how education decisions should be made. but at the same time i do support the idea of consideration putting an armed patrol officer. my sister in atlanta works at a receiving desk, and she's not prepared or trained for dealing with someone coming into the school. i woul
bit of fear into these people. it just shows the control the wealthy have over the government in both parties. host: more from "the washington post." they write -- back to the telephones. derrick from maryland on the line for democrats. your thoughts about the fiscal clause bill. caller: i think they will do a good deal if they can keep mitch mcconnell out of there. one of the things i really have a problem with, that is when thing i say democrats, let's get the ground game for 2014. republicansd of the at enter the house. let's take the house and just ran it all down their throats. host: we will move onto glen on the line for independents. caller: here is the problem that we have a. we have people that are working hard for the american people. we have a constitution. we have deviated from the constitution. host: who are the people working hard for the american people? caller: the american citizens. it takes two american citizens -- your mother and father have to be american citizens to be the president of the united states. we need to have a confirmation hearing. on the birth certifi
a message from the tea party members everywhere. destroying government is not good politics. you are acting against the majority rule right now. you are trying to bring down the majority government by obstruction. people will remember. people who believe in government will remember it. people who believe in national defense and social security and medicare. they will know which party is trying to destroy working democracy in order to pursue its political ends. they will know who respects the voter and who thumbs his nose at the voter. we go over this cliff and you will not have to ask for whom the bell tolls, it will be tolling for you. leading off tonight, josh green and chris frates of "national journal." you don't have to be as clear as i but try, gentlemen, tonight. it looks to me like one party, once again it's asymmetric. both parties are not screwing around, one is. is that true? >> i think both parties want to go over the cliff. >> both want to go over the cliff? who will get blamed? >> i think republicans will get blamed, but i think republicans at this point fear casting a career-
geithner. it could delay the tax filings. the government relies on august revenue to come in and it usually comes flooding in during march and april. people need to pay their taxes, but they don't know which tax rules will apply. host: the other deadline is the debt limit. here at $16.4 trillion. guest: >> the treasury department can stop funding federal pensions and do some other maneuvers, essentially to buy them another six weeks of time. we all at this last year. closer they get to that is when financial markets will start going crazy. the debates we are having now about tax and spending will likely be the same debates we are having six weeks from now. host: there's the u.s. debt clock. you can also see how much that is for individuals and what protection is moving ahead. our guest is damian paletta of the wall street journal. the covers finances and congress and the white house. his work is available online. from the senate floor yesterday, these comments by the senate democratic leader harry reid. [video clip] >> the speakership all members of the house back to washington today. he sh
basic expansion of knowledge through a government funded entity like nasa -- is that the way we should go? my personal feeling is there is a tremendous value over time that has come close from demand i do believe robotics will be on the time scale of the next 20 years as -- or so. probably as they make predictions, which is always hard. it will have more economic impact on how we were driving our cars and fly our planes and how research is being performed. it is my belief if you go through 30 or more years, that prediction will be a lot tougher to make. want to put the human in the loop and go to places where you do not know where you are going, and two exploration the help of sun cover aspects of our experience and did all aspects of technology that will have tremendous impact. even though they examples you mention are compelling, there are many aspects that come from a human side of nasa as well. i would not subscribe to that kind of recommendation. >> lower the emphasis a bit. >> making a distinction between science and exploration, nasa is more than just a science agency, it is an
worry about the growth of government and so we have to use these leverage points to try to do those things that naturally leaders should do themselves but that is where we are at a nation and that is what we have to do over the next several months to ensure that we don't continue down this path of insolvency that we are on right now. >> greta: you mentioned other countries in the world. do you not wonder what they think about us. in we can't even manage our own economy and our own finances and meanwhile trying to assert diplomatic authority around the world when we can't even take care of our own problems. sort of wonder even the impact that has that we look so poor in how we are handling this? >> there is no question that our moral authority around the world that's been greatly weakened for numbers of reasons but certainly this issue, i mean people are watching, i was talking to somebody today in europe and they were saying the only thing that is on the news there is whether the american politicians if you will are going to deal with this issue that is before us. so no doubt we are
. these are reckless and these changes will produce a government mandated calamity. it was only agreed to because it was never meant to be enacted. it was just a fail safe. it's not working right now. it's brutal and wrong headed as it might particularly be, let's just say at this particular moment as the president closed tonight, it said things are just getting better. it's the worst mistake. there's just too much hatred between the two parties to head it off. put simply, sometimes i think they would rather throw us back into recession than to portray their principle business compromising. the only way these politicians know how to save the nation's village is to burn it down. the opposite irony of today's session. given the hardship that beckons if we fall off the cliff and chance that no deal is possible let alone one that can be reached in a few day's time, why weren't we down much more? why weren't we off gigantically? why didn't we fall off the stock cliff today? why didn't we detonate? why do we have one of those down 500 points days? that seemed reasonable. we said 7% when congress reject
communications are looked at by the government. people want amendments. unfortunately congress once again is acting at the last minute trying to renew something about to expire and there is probably not the time to do revisions that are necessary. that's a problem here. harris: because critics want this to be revised as you just put it. the white house doesn't. it wants it to pass the way it is. a lot of people are in favor of it because it is helping to keep us safe since there is homegrown terror in the united states and we need to find it. i want to if which have the words put it up on the screen. kentucky senator rand paul had this to say on the senate floor yesterday. and what he was basically saying is that this interferes and disputes the power of the fourth amendment. and that it needs to be changed. again, dan, you say we may not see any changes to it because the deadline is tuesday? >> it is really important to note that even the supporters of renewing acknowledge there needs to be reform. there needs to be more oversight. we need to know more how the fisa court works. we want m
for anyone looking to become more familiar with how government works and the ins and outs of capitol hill. >> julie seger on c-span on verizon. c-span has been brought to you by your television provider as a public service. >> next, it is a global look at the economy with a speech by greek economist. among his many books, the economics professor recently minotaur" andobal natar we will show you as much as we can before the house gavels in at 2:00 p.m. eastern. [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, france, -- friends, this is a singular honor to be a guest in this temple of civic life. thanks to all the good people for making this possible, to my publisher, the staff that are manning the barricades outside. my novel is debt crisis and the future of the world economy. i will be arguing that there is no such thing as a debt crisis. there is no debt crisis in the united states of america and europe, and there is no such thing as the debt crisis in my own country, which is nevertheless being consumed by debt. you know the joke about balloonist. the balloon has been blown off isrse, and at some p
taxes and families making between $40-65,000 a year will pay an extra two grand to the government. >> and tomorrow, john barosso and kent conrad will be sitting down with chris wallace will be talking about the fiscal cliff. check your local listings for the time and channel in your area. >> heather: president obama nominating john kerry to be the next secretary of state. he currently chairs the foreign relations committee. he called on congress to move quickly on the confirmation. peter doocy has the story from washington. >> reporter: a week after susan rice told president obama not to nominate her for secretary of state because she thought the nomination process would be lengthy and costly, the president picks john kerry to make america's top diplomat as the country is leaving two wars but facing issues in syria, iranian and north korea. >> john's entire life has prepared him for his role as the son of a foreign service officer. he has a deep respect for the men and women of the state department. the role they play in advancing our interests and values, the risks that they unde
an actual all-time high again. anyway, among the catalysts, a new pro-business government preparing to assume leadership, incoming prime minister shinzo abe. what is it, 50,000 that it has to get to? >> 39,000 i believe is the peak. >> who's counting, right? that's a ways off. >> yeah. far away. >> shinzo abe has been putting pressure on the bank of japan to raise its inflation target in hopes of extricating the country from two decades of deflation. i guess if you just raised the target -- >> that would help. >> okay. >> it doesn't matter what your target is if you can't hit it. >> we found that out here. >>> meantime, in europe markets are closed for the boxing day holiday. seems weird to do it just for a bunch of people to -- >> box up the gifts and return them. >> it's not a -- >> bad, i know. >> it is boxing. what kind of boxing are we -- boxer rebellion? >> i've never understood boxing day. >> we have to look it up. >> i literally have no idea. >> or it's on google. no, is there anything on google that is different? let me see. just a regular -- >> is there their our way to fi
. the russian government's politically-motivated decision will reduce adoption possibilities for children who are now under institutional care. we regret that the russian government has taken this step and are further concerned about statements that adoptions already underway may be stopped." i have a cold, and i took nyquil, but i'm still stubbed up. [ male announcer ] truth is, nyquil doesn't unstuff your nose. what? [ male announcer ] alka-seltzer plus liquid gels speeds relief to your worst cold symptoms plus has a decongestant for your stuffy nose. thanks. that's the cold truth! time for citi price rewind. because your daughter really wants that pink castle thing. and you really don't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and if it finds one, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super sparkly day! ok. [ male announcer ] now all you need is a magic carriage. citi price rewind. start saving at citi.com/pricerewind. citi price rewind. tyeah, its the galaxy note ii.r
the cultural revolution. why? he says, because then you knew the government was the enemy, now you're not sure. [laughter] so i said you already want to bring up about a democratic system. they said yes. i'm not a law teacher. so after they say how much they're all favored the market, i said that's a very interesting question, point. i favorite. i favorite, but i've noticed from what i've read that there are millions of people in china who make just a few dollars a day. and they are on the own land and they're not very rich really. and you have quite a lot of money i gather. i was told. and suppose they also look, we are in the majority, and justice money down you. we're going to take it all away from you and give it to us. and the one who started this, i said to you favor that? if that's the result. he said i am in favor of democracy, but maybe not right now. [laughter] so you see, it's like a tiger by the tail. so you start looking at the other side, and they are afraid of a certain kind of chaos or of a certain kind of, and so somehow you have to, you have to, now that, that is partly, that
with the government's first position on guantanamo bay was no-man's land they already rented from cuba the majority was to the extent that the law exists in guantanamo bay. there is no other power, certainly castro is not controlling what was happening there. so, to the government said habeas corpus doesn't extend to guantanamo bay so for that purpose of this part of the usa and a follow on cases in in the lower court so all of the returns are in. >> the next question is 1i know you never get. what is your view of the nomination process that comes from fort lewis and how might it be improved to make it less frustrating were demeaning to? >> it wasn't always the way it has been for the nominations. it would include our chief justice, justice alito, justice so why -- sotomayor and justice kagan. people decided to go along party lines. contrast that with the way that it was when i was nominated in 1993 in the justice breyer the following year. my biggest supporter of the senate judiciary committee was senator orrin hatch and he confirmed that and he wrote an autobiography in which he takes great pride
to ezzpows like the assault rivals. the government dyeds what -- decides what type of firearm every person in the united states of america is allowed to own or not allowed to own, that is the start of the loss of the second amendment, and that will be the disarming of the united states of america. host: kenneth, you talked about the liberals. but in this article, the "new york daily news" this morning, they quote several republicans, among them, senator tom coburn, also objected to lapierre's plan, sort of. he said -- host: what are your thoughts to those responses from those republicans? caller: i agree with those comments. let me say this, as far as the more broad sense of this issue with regards to the connecticut shootings. it's perfectly clear that the young man that committed that atrocity was troubled individual. the problem with our society is that we need something to recognize, deal with, and stride help with, for the people, the families, the parents that have to do that. i've read a number of articles since then where by sthradse have that mental illness, but when they go to se
also want to see hiring happening and that's where that government jobs report that we focus on once a month, that's where that comes into play. we're going to get the next one next week, that government jobs report and the big worry, carol, that's hanging over all of this is the fiscal cliff. although we're still in the middle of wondering what congress is going to do about it, companies are already holding back hiring so that is clearly impacting the jobs market but the good news once again is the layoffs are slowing, down 12,000 to 350,000 last week. carol? >> thank you very much, washington. alison kosik thank you so much. >>> growing outrage over the decision of a new york newspaper to publish a map with the names and addresses of people who have gun permits. the interactive map was created with information available publicly. it pinpoints the location of legally licensed permit holders for handguns. we reached out for a statement from the newspaper, it sent us this, "the massacre in newtown, connecticut, remains at top-of-mind for many of our readers. or readers are understanda
that in three business days, the summit government is going to run out of borrowing capacity. john, if there were a treasurer in a business who went to their boss and said by the way, three business days, the working capital account dies and as a result, you are not going to make payroll next week, that person would be fired. we get three days notice about hitting the debt ceiling? that seems absurd to me. >> it is not a surprise.rise we have known we were coming to this point and there are two months more -- geithner estimated in that letter that the ways in which the federal government can manage money will give about would months worth of head room, possibly even longer. february or march or -- where we really get to the -- rubber hits the road on that issue. so -- this is not a shock to anybody in government but the publication of this letter and the elevation of the issues in attempt was done in 2011. there was an early moatfication by treasury this was about to happen, trying to get congress to move in a -- interest didn't work then. we will see if it works now. >> defaulting
think about politics, how we think about government, how we think about each other. >> there is a cultural shift, and jon meacham, i thought it was very telling what newt gingrich said about the republican party's challenges. he said they either wake up to the realities that are facing them. this election was much worse for them than they expected, or there will be young voters who will be obama democrats for the next 40 years. this could be a watershed election if the republicans don't respond in the correct way. >> one of the interesting things -- and i wonder if rick in thinking all this out, if what you all made of this -- is, you know, fdr had this legacy. you still had people -- hubert humphrey was still running in 1 1968 as an fdr democrat. one question i have is, is this wave of democrats, and is obama himself a sui generous figure or is he a kiclintonian figure? >> i addressed some of this. the "r" word, realignment, is something that people are talking about. there was a reagan realignment, and basically you could argue that this is finally the end of the
government pays farmers. john blackstone reports. >> who wants milk? >> me. >> me. >> me. >> reporter: with four children the rasmussen family in california drinks about five gallons a week on milk. if congress doesn't pass the bill, i would cost him $106. that has dad sean rasmussen worried. >> they have to have their milk. we might have to cut elsewhere. >> reporter: without new legislation government prices revert back to 1939 levels. back then the process was more laborious and farmers needed a higher subsidy to cover their costs. dan sumner says the new price of milk would be far above what it now costs dairy farmers to produce it. >> it really will be chaos. >> reporter: so we would go back to this old farm bill which would force the government to buy milk at an extremely high price. >> that's right. >> reporter: this could be a windfall for dairy farmers. >> well, here's the problem for dairy farmers. they don't want chaos in the milk market. it sounds good. gee, everybody will double or triple the price, but who's going to buy it? >> caller: nobody will buy it. >> nobody will
.s. government is calling in the national academy of sciences for yet another safety review of airport scanners. the department of homeland security says the nonprofit group of scientists will be charged with reviewing previous studies done on the scanners. the call comes amid continuing concerns from some members of congress, as well as some scientists, about the amount of radiation that the scanners subject travelers to. brave investors who bought junk-rated greek bonds in january of 2012 are sitting on profits. the highly-risky bond buy during an extremely volatile time for the country has earned investors 20 times more than people who purchased top-rated german debt this year. bloomberg news reports the return on the greek junk bonds is up 80%, compared to a gain of just 3.7% for german bonds. it helped that greece's credit rating was upgraded to b- in june from "selective default" when the greek soveriegn debt was restructed. making those new year's resolutions to live healthier affects your waistline and your wallet. bankrate.com has listed some of those popular resolutions and crunched
the syrian government from attacks its own men, women and children. and human rights group reporting the regime shelled a bakery and a rebel held town killing 20 people, including at least 8 children. we cannot independently confirm this, of course. meanwhile, russian officials say they are set to meet with the united nations special envoy to syria this weekend. russia has repeatedly blocked the united nations from taking action against the syrian government but has recently taken steps to distance itself from the syrian regime. egypt's president mohammed morsi portion of voters opposed the enough constitution. he is calling for dialogue now to address the divisions that has polarized the nation and led to mass protests. still he had nothing concrete to offer his opponents. new document passed in a referendum with nearly 64% of the vote. critics say it restricts freedom and expands the influence of islamic law. president morsi and supporters says moderate democratic state in fighting depression, dictatorship, nepotism and corruption. the holiday shopping season is drawing to a close
,000 a year would pay an extra two grand or so to the government. gregg: the big question, do lawmakers hope to get anything out of the last minute fiscal cliff talks or is it just for show? democratic congressman chris van hollen is the ranking member of the house budget committee. he will be joining us live coming up in the next hour what he really thinks is going on. patti ann: well the u.s. economy meanwhile could suffer yet another major blow. looming strikes at ports from next sass to boston are threatening to put thousands of americans out of work. with potential losses for u.s. businesses ranging in the billions. >> the port of baltimore is one of maryland's largest economic generators. any type of work action that may result in a suspension or stoppage of work would have an adverse effect. >> we handle more cars, we handle more farm and construction equipment than any other u.s. port. patti ann: we're learning that adverse effect could take a toll on the economy. fox business network's stuart varney has more for us on that this morning. good morning, stu. >> good morning, patti ann.
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